It Is Both Ridiculous And Dangerous To Make Domain Registrars Liable For Content On Domains

BY MIKE MASNICK
TECHDIRT
Going back more than five years, we’ve been warning about the dangers of moving copyright enforcement down the stack, away from the actual hosting companies deeper and deeper into infrastructure. This was, of course, part of the goal of SOPA — to make infrastructure companies liable for infringement, and to force them to shut down entire sites.

List of BBC web pages which have been removed from Google

BY NEIL MCINTOSH BBC

Since a European Court of Justice ruling last year, individuals have the right to request that search engines remove certain web pages from their search results. Those pages usually contain personal information about individuals. Following the ruling, Google removed a large number of links from its search results, including some to BBC web pages, and continues to delist pages from BBC Online. The BBC has decided to make clear to licence fee payers which pages have been removed from Google’s search results by publishing this list of links. Each month, we’ll republish this list with new removals added at the top.

Russia ‘will block’ Google, Twitter and Facebook if they withhold blogger data

REUTERS (MOSCOW)THE GUARDIAN – UK
Russia’s media watchdog has written to Google, Twitter and Facebook warning them against violating Russian internet laws and a spokesman said they risked being blocked if they did not comply. Roskomnadzor said it had sent letters this week to the three US-based internet companies asking them to comply with laws that critics of President Vladimir Putin have decried as censorship. “In our letters we regularly remind [companies] of the consequences of violating the legislation,” said Roskomnadzor spokesman Vadim Ampelonsky. He added that because of the encryption technology used by the three firms, Russia had no way of blocking specific websites and so could only bring down particular content it deemed in violation of law by blocking access to their whole services. To comply with the law the three firms must hand over data on Russian bloggers with more than 3,000 readers per day and take down websites that Roskomnadzor saw as containing calls for “unsanctioned protests and unrest”, Ampelonsky said.

EBook piracy sites to be blocked by UK net providers

BBC
Seven websites that help users find unauthorised copies of eBooks are to be blocked in the UK by the country’s leading broadband providers. The Publishers Association has obtained a High Court order that requires the internet service providers (ISPs) to act by 9 June. The offending sites are based overseas. The movie, music and luxury goods industries have previously employed similar tactics to cause more than 100 other sites to be blocked. The Publishers Association said that more than 80% of the material it had found on the ad-supported platforms involved, had infringed copyright.

What’s Scarier: Terrorism, or Governments Blocking Websites in its Name?

BY GLENN GREENWALD THE INTERCEPT
The French Interior Ministry on Monday ordered that five websites be blocked on the grounds that they promote or advocate terrorism. “I do not want to see sites that could lead people to take up arms on the Internet,” proclaimed Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve. When the block functions properly, visitors to those banned sites, rather than accessing the content of the sites they chose to visit, will be automatically redirected to the Interior Ministry website. There, they will be greeted by a graphic of a large red hand, and text informing them that they were attempting to access a site that causes or promotes terrorism: “you are being redirected to this official website since your computer was about to connect with a page that provokes terrorist acts or condones terrorism publicly.”
No judge reviews the Interior Ministry’s decisions. The minister first requests that the website owner voluntarily remove the content he deems transgressive; upon disobedience, the minister unilaterally issues the order to Internet service providers for the sites to be blocked. This censorship power is vested pursuant to a law recently enacted in France empowering the interior minister to block websites.

India’s Supreme Court Scraps Section 66A, Protects Online Freedom of Speech

BY AMIT CHATURVEDINDTV
The Supreme Court has scrapped a contentious law that was seen as a major infringement of the freedom of speech online because it allowed the arrest of a person for posting offensive content. Section 66A of the Information Technology Act, has been declared unconstitutional. Describing the law as “vague in its entirety,” the judges said, it encroaches upon “the public’s right to know.” The law had been challenged first by a law student named Shreya Singhal after two young women were arrested in 2012 for posting comments critical of the total shutdown in Mumbai after the death of Bal Thackeray, the Shiv Sena chief. The group that challenged the law in the Supreme Court expanded to include the NGO Common Cause and  Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasreen.

ICANN, copyright infringement, and “the public interest”

BY DAVID POST WASHINGTON POST

Last month, the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) issued a carefully-worded statement urging ICANN – the overseer of much of the Internet’s fundamental naming and numbering infrastructure – to take more vigorous action against  the “use of domain names for illegal and abusive activities, including those related to IP infringement” (i.e., motion picture piracy).  [See “MPAA Pushes for ICANN Policy Changes to Target ‘Pirate’ Domains”].  
And just a few days ago, the recording industry joined in; a letter from the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA)  to ICANN, while expressing the industry’s “disappointment with . . .

ISP Categorically Refuses to Block Pirate Bay – Trial Set For October

BY ANDY TORRENT FREAK

Following a hearing last month during which agreement was sought between entertainment companies and Swedish ISP Bredbandsbolaget, the provider has confirmed there will be no compromise. The ISP will not block The Pirate Bay and insists that customers have the right to communicate freely online. A trial is now set for October. Despite its current difficulties in maintaining an efficient online presence, The Pirate Bay remains the world’s most hounded website. Entertainment industry companies around the globe have made the notorious site their number one anti-piracy target and legal action continues in many regions.

Spanish Court Limits Scope Of EU’s Right To Be Forgotten

BY GLYN MOODY TECHDIRT
EU’s ‘right to be forgotten’ is still relatively new — the original ruling was made less than a year ago. Since then, the EU courts and companies have been trying to work out what it means in practice, which has led to some broadening of its reach. But an interesting court ruling in Spain seems to limit its scope. It concerns the following case, reported here by Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society:
The claimant was a Spanish citizen who found that when typing his name on Google Search, the results included a link to a blog with information about a crime he had committed many years ago. While the official criminal records had already been cancelled, the information was thus still findable on the internet.

France can now block suspected terrorism websites without a court order

BY AMAR TOOR
THE VERGE

A new decree that went into effect today allows the French government to block websites accused of promoting terrorism and publishing child pornography, without seeking a court order. Under the new rules, published last week by France’s Ministry of the Interior, internet service providers (ISPs) must take down offending websites within 24 hours of receiving a government order. French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve says the decree is critical to combatting terrorism, but civil rights groups say it gives the government dangerously broad powers to suppress free speech. The regulations have been under consideration since 2011, but gained new momentum following last month’s terrorist attacks at the Paris office of the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. The French government has launched a massive anti-terror campaign in the wake of the attacks, countering radical online propaganda with its own anti-jihad website and arresting dozens of suspected terrorism supporters.